in Travels with my angst

Separation Anxiety (or why the Black Swan will remain in Tacloban)

The Black Swan in front of the BRP Benguet at the Tacloban port.

The Black Swan in front of the BRP Benguet at the Tacloban port.

TACLOBAN CITY–The Black Swan–that’s the bike I brought to Tacloban in May, which is named after the book I finished reading (for the third time) while onboard the BRP Benguet just last week–will stay in the Eastern Visayas capital, owing to popular demand.

My co-workers in Tacloban, including Reina Garcia, have asked me to leave the bike behind before I make my way to Manila.

They will need the Black Swan to zip around the city, from the apartment to the solar charging station (which are both located along P. Burgos Street), among other locations.

That’s what they say.

And of course, I believe them.

After all, although the Black Swan has been with me for just one year this September, it has accompanied me to several locations in Luzon and most recently, in Eastern Visayas.

While riding the Black Swan, I’ve been to Novaliches in Quezon City, Antipolo City, Tacloban City, Tanauan and Palo in Leyte, and Sta. Rita in Samar (where I had several breakfasts since it was the first town immediately after getting off from the Leyte side of the San Juanico Bridge).

I’m too busy packing and wrapping things up to think about the ramifications of the decision to leave the bike behind, however temporary the arrangement is.

But one thing’s for sure: the Black Swan and I will be reunited. (Even if I have to get on a ten-day boat trip to get back to Tacloban, which is the subject of another blog entry.)

FROM THE DRAMA AND THEATER ARTS DEPT. Having stayed in Tacloban for the better part of three months starting May, I would like to thank a whole lot of people for making the experience enjoyable–and apologies for being dramatic–life-changing.

Red Constantino, executive director of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (iCSC), for the patience and the opportunity to allow me to stay (and write to a lesser degree) in Tacloban;

Reina Garcia, iCSC project director, for patience, understanding, and putting up with too much information;

Lottie Salarda, InterAksyon.com contributor, for putting things in the context;

Nick, friendly neighborhood kid who has always asked for me when I wasn’t around to everyone’s consternation;

and, last but not the least, Adrian Burce; for the beers and better Internet in Tacloban.

7 comments
Nguyenchinh
Nguyenchinh

It describes her perfectly because  Bộ dụng cụ đa năng her prose is way ahead of her time.

She may have used epithets — Mongoloid, Negro — which were deemed acceptable during her time.

Nguyenchinh
Nguyenchinh

After all, although the Black Swan has been with  bảng ghim văn phòng  me for just one year this September, it has accompanied me to several locations in Luzon and most recently, in Eastern Visayas

Nguyenchinh
Nguyenchinh

upular three-by-six apartment, though  thang nhôm rút đơn  stylized with the latest in doorknobs and light switches…is still oppressive to all that is human in one. The soul must have room to move in, where it is quiet and

Nguyenchinh
Nguyenchinh

Unfortunately,    Két sắt  you’ll find none of that warmth in this one-minute (or so) podcast describing the political pitfalls of our former President Joseph “Erap” Estrada.